Holy of Holies

From H.P.Blavatsky - Teopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Holy of Holies. The Assyriologists, Egyptologists, and Orientalists, in general, show that such a place existed in every temple of antiquity. The great temple of Bel-Merodach whose sides faced the four cardinal points, had in its extreme end a “Holy of Holies” hidden from the profane by a veil: here, “at the beginning of the year ‘the divine king of heaven and earth, the lord of the heavens, seats himself’.” According to Herodotus, here was the golden image of the god with a golden table in front like the Hebrew table for the shew bread, and upon this, food appears to have been placed. in some temples there also was “a little coffer or ark with two engraved stone tablets on it”. (Myer’s Qabbalah.) In short, it is now pretty well proven, that the “chosen people” had nothing original of their own, but that every detail of their ritualism and religion was borrowed from older nations. The Hibbert Lectures by Prof. Sayce and others show this abundantly. The story of the birth of Moses is that of Sargon, the Babylonian, who preceded Moses by a couple of thousand years; and no wonder, as Dr. Sayce tells us that the name of Moses, Mosheh, has a connection with the name of the Babylonian sun-god as the “hero” or “leader”. (Hib. Lect., p. 46 et seq.) Says Mr. J. Myer, “The orders of the priests were divided into high priests, those attached or bound to certain deities, like the Hebrew Levites; anointers or cleaners ; the Kali, ‘illustrious’ or ‘elders’; the soothsayers, and the Makhkhu or ‘great one’, in which Prof. Delitzsch sees the Rab-mag of the Old Testament. . . The Akkadians and Chaldeans kept a Sabbath day of rest every seven days, they also had thanksgiving days, and days for humiliation and prayer. There were sacrifices of vegetables and animals, of meats and wine. . . . The number seven was especially sacred. . . . The great temple of Babylon existed long before 2,250 B.c. Its ‘Holy of Holies’ was with in the shrine of Nebo, the prophet god of wisdom.” It is from the Akkadians that the god Mardak passed to the Assyrians, and he had been before Merodach, “the merciful”, of the Babylonians, the only son and interpreter of the will of Ea or Hea, the great Deity of Wisdom. The Assyriologists have, in short, unveiled the whole scheme of the “chosen people”.

Source: H.P.Blavatsky - The Theosophical Glossary